Wyoming Invasion : Preventing Invasive Species

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Wyoming Invasion : Preventing Invasive Species

Preventing aquatic invasive species from establishing populations in Wyoming waters sounds like a daunting task, considering invasive mussels have been detected in neighboring states such as Utah and Colorado, and in water just 60 miles from the Wyoming border. 
However, Regina Dickson is up to the challenge. Dickson’s enthusiasm for and dedication to her job is obvious. After working as a technician for two summers, Dickson is in her third year, now a crew leader in the Wyoming Game and Fish Departments Aquatic Invasive Species (

 

AIS) Program. Dickson directs the program for southwest Wyoming and supervises five technicians who work on Flaming Gorge Reservoir.
Early detection of aquatic invasive species results in greater potential for containment or eradication of the invasive species, ultimately minimizing the negative effects and financial burden caused by the introduction of aquatic invasive species. New Wyoming regulations require that any watercraft transported into Wyoming from March 1 through November 30 must undergo a mandatory inspection by an authorized inspector prior to launching in any water of the state. Year-around, any watercraft that has been in a water infested with zebra or quagga mussels within the past 30 days is required to undergo a mandatory inspection by an authorized inspector prior to launching.